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Step Up Oklahoma identifies supporters of their plan

Related coverage

Step Up Oklahoma: How the organization formed and evolved Step Up Oklahoma: OEA endorses initiative in push for teacher pay hikes Step Up Oklahoma: Edmondson wants gross production tax raised to 7 percent Step Up Oklahoma: Lamb says budget hole should be filled without tax hikes Step Up Oklahoma: Oil groups extend support Step Up Oklahoma: Reforms requested by business, civic leaders Step Up Oklahoma: State business, civic leaders offer revenue, reform package Step Up Oklahoma: Revenue raising measures proposed by business coalition and civic leaders Step Up Oklahoma: Supporters of plan identified Step Up Oklahoma: Lawmakers eyeing budget, revenue fixes with new bills

Following is a list of Oklahoma business and civic leaders who were listed on the Step Up Oklahoma website Thursday as endorsing a package of proposals designed to resolve the state's budget impasse and providing money for $5,000 teacher pay raises:

• Phil Albert, President, Pelco Structural — Claremore

• Bill Anoatubby, Governor, Chickasaw Nation — Ada

• Calvin Anthony, Tiger Drug — Stillwater

• Gary Batton, Chief, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma — Durant

• Clay Bennett, Chairman, Dorchester Capital Corp. — Oklahoma City

• John Berrey, Chairman, Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma — Quapaw

• Dan Boren, President, Corporate Development Chickasaw Nation — Oklahoma City

• John Bumgarner, Real Estate Developer, Bumgarner Asset Management LLC — Tulsa

• Mike Burrage, Attorney, Whitten Burrage Law Firm — Antlers

• Bill Cameron, Chairman & CEO, American Fidelity — Oklahoma City

• Glenn Coffee, Attorney, Glenn Coffee & Associates — Oklahoma City

• Sean Cummings, President, Cummings Oil Company — Oklahoma City

• Bob Drake, Owner, Drake Farms — Davis

• Gentner Drummond, Lawyer, Drummond Law — Tulsa

• Jeff Dunn, President & CEO, Mill Creek Lumber — Tulsa

• John "Chip" Fudge, Chairman, Claims Management Resources — Oklahoma City

• David Griffin, President & CEO, Griffin Communications — Tulsa and Oklahoma City

• John Groendyke, CEO, Groendyke Transport — Enid

• Gordy Guest, Senior Principal & President, Cyntergy AEC — Tulsa

• Harold Hamm, Chairman & CEO, Continental Resources — Oklahoma City

• Jimmy Harrel, Chairman & CEO, Bank of Western Oklahoma — Leedey

• Sandra Harrison, Oklahoma Hospital Association — Oklahoma City

• Judy Hatfield, Founding Principal, Equity Realty — Norman

• Jay Helm, President and CEO, American Residential Group — Tulsa

• Jake Henry Jr., President and CEO, Saint Francis Health System — Tulsa

• Brad Henry, Former Governor of Oklahoma — Shawnee

• Josh Herron, President, Landmark Bank — Ardmore

• Rhonda Hooper, President & CEO, Jordan Advertising — Oklahoma City

• Bob Howard, President, Mercedes-Benz Volvo of OKC — Oklahoma City

• Cliff Hudson, CEO, Sonic — Oklahoma City

• Blu Hulsey, Senior VP Government Relations, Continental Resources — Oklahoma City

• Craig Jones, President, Oklahoma Hospital Association — Oklahoma City

• John Kennedy, CEO, Kennedy Consulting Group — Oklahoma City

• Ken Lackey, Chairman, Nordam — Tulsa

• Bill Lance, Secretary of Commerce, Chickasaw Nation — Sulphur

• Brett Lessley, President, Griffin Management — Tulsa

• Tucker Link, member OSU/A&M Board of Regents — Finley

• Greg Love, Co-CEO, Love's Travel Stops & Country Stores — Oklahoma City

• Paula Marshall, CEO, Bama — Tulsa

• Ed Martin, Chairman, Ackerman McQueen — Oklahoma City

• Bill Masterson, President & Publisher, Tulsa World Media Company — Tulsa

• Tom McDaniel, President, American Fidelity Foundation — Oklahoma City

• Rick Mosier, President & General Counsel, Robson Properties — Tulsa

• Mike Neal, President & CEO, Tulsa Regional Chamber — Tulsa

• Larry Nichols, Chairman, Devon Energy — Oklahoma City

• Elizabeth Osburn, Senior Vice President of Government Affairs, Tulsa Regional Chamber — Tulsa

• Jody Parker, CEO, Anchor Stone — Tulsa

• Kevin Perry, President, Perry Broadcasting — Oklahoma City

• Russell Perry, Chairman, Perry Broadcasting — Oklahoma City

• Gary Pierson, President & CEO, Oklahoma Publishing Co. — Oklahoma City

• Gary Poulos, Division President, Mill Creek Lumber & Supply — Tulsa

• Dr. Stephen M. Prescott, President, OMRF — Oklahoma City

• David Rainbolt, Executive Chairman, BancFirst — Oklahoma City

• Roger Ramseyer, Vice President/Market Leader, Cox Communications — Tulsa

• Jeff Records, Chairman & CEO, Midfirst Bank — Oklahoma City

• Larry Rooney, President, Manhattan Construction Group — Tulsa

• Frank Robson, Chairman, RCB Bank — Tulsa

• Joe Robson, President, The Robson Companies — Tulsa

• Michael Samis, Founder, Samis Family Investments — Oklahoma City

• Hastings Siegfried, Vice Chairman & Chief Operating Office of Asia Pacific, The NORDAM Group, Inc. — Tulsa

• Lee Allen Smith, Chairman, Oklahoma Events — Oklahoma City

• Robin Smith, CEO, WeGoLook — Oklahoma City

• David Thompson, President & CEO, InvesTrust — Oklahoma City

• Sean Trauschke, CEO, OG&E — Oklahoma City

• Mike Turpen, Attorney, Riggs, Abney, Neal, Turpen, Orbison & Lewis — Oklahoma City

• Jack White, Owner, Financial Equipment Company — Jenks

• Lynn White, Oklahoma Hospital Association — Oklahoma City

• Clark Wiens, President, Cedar Creek Lumber — Tulsa

• Roy Williams, President, Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce — Oklahoma City

• Allen Wright, Devon Energy — Oklahoma City

• Darton Zink, Owner, President & CEO, Zeeco, Inc. — Tulsa

Related coverage

Step Up Oklahoma: How the organization formed and evolved Step Up Oklahoma: OEA endorses initiative in push for teacher pay hikes Step Up Oklahoma: Edmondson wants gross production tax raised to 7 percent Step Up Oklahoma: Lamb says budget hole should be filled without tax hikes Step Up Oklahoma: Oil groups extend support Step Up Oklahoma: Reforms requested by business, civic leaders Step Up Oklahoma: State business, civic leaders offer revenue, reform package Step Up Oklahoma: Revenue raising measures proposed by business coalition and civic leaders Step Up Oklahoma: Supporters of plan identified Step Up Oklahoma: Lawmakers eyeing budget, revenue fixes with new bills

Related Photos
David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker,  unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center.  Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018,  that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government.  The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes.  The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments.  Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman

David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed...

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5593bd3fe31b2fd4dfe27bd66dc25b01.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f3c9776c11882ece6c07d770a9f82241.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, speak at a news conference. Coffee's law firm is due to receive $5.6 million in the Purdue opioid case settlement. [Jim Beckel/The Oklahoman] " title=" David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, speak at a news conference. Coffee's law firm is due to receive $5.6 million in the Purdue opioid case settlement. [Jim Beckel/The Oklahoman] "><figcaption> David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, speak at a news conference. Coffee's law firm is due to receive $5.6 million in the Purdue opioid case settlement. [Jim Beckel/The Oklahoman] </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-65a724435c59d84c0a7261f7ec45bb6b.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-fb9601ddfe246930db76fb8eda192237.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-5df48eeae14dda58f763b770278df182.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-7ae3dddb7e6617437c8cc889aa914f46.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, right, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, right, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, right, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-a478731545154e417033cd6b1d8936b1.jpg" alt="Photo - Phil Albert, president of Pelco Structural, and an OU regent, spoke in favor of the proposed reform and revenue measures at the news conference. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Phil Albert, president of Pelco Structural, and an OU regent, spoke in favor of the proposed reform and revenue measures at the news conference. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Phil Albert, president of Pelco Structural, and an OU regent, spoke in favor of the proposed reform and revenue measures at the news conference. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f1593ba5e3c24add8e7132c01b811fa2.jpg" alt="Photo - Tucker Link is a member of Step Up who spoke at the news conference. Link is founder and chairman of Knightsbridge Investments, and is an OSU/A&amp;M regent. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="Tucker Link is a member of Step Up who spoke at the news conference. Link is founder and chairman of Knightsbridge Investments, and is an OSU/A&amp;M regent. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>Tucker Link is a member of Step Up who spoke at the news conference. Link is founder and chairman of Knightsbridge Investments, and is an OSU/A&amp;M regent. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-29ab01a263328cfd78e2148afde7cd1d.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, left, and attorney Glenn Coffee, former state senator and Oklahoma Secretary of State, unveil reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-ef3404f11417cef99e521f5283fcdff7.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, answers a reporter's question at a news conference in the Oklahoma History Center where he and other business leaders unveiled reform and revenue measures. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, answers a reporter's question at a news conference in the Oklahoma History Center where he and other business leaders unveiled reform and revenue measures. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, answers a reporter's question at a news conference in the Oklahoma History Center where he and other business leaders unveiled reform and revenue measures. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure><figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-22cf2ef3e4ca69240f51d545cdf0e960.jpg" alt="Photo - David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman " title="David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman "><figcaption>David Rainbolt, an Oklahoma banker, unveils reform and revenue measures at a news conference in the atrium of the Oklahoma History Center. Frustrated by a legislative budget impasse that has stalled state progress, a statewide coalition of Oklahoma business and civic leaders (STEPUPOK) proposed a comprehensive solution Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, that would increase state revenues, fund $5,000 teacher pay raises and alter the structure of state and county government. The proposal calls for raising gross production, motor fuel and cigarette taxes, while eliminating certain individual income tax deductions and loopholes. The business leaders said their willingness to support the proposed revenue hikes is directly tied to lawmakers' willingness to vote for $5,000 teacher pay increases and embrace 10 reforms to the structure of state and county government, many of which also would require the public's approval through votes on constitutional amendments. Photo by Jim Beckel, The Oklahoman </figcaption></figure>
Randy Ellis

For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two... Read more ›

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