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What to do in Oklahoma on Aug. 21, 2017: Check out the eclipse activities at Science Museum Oklahoma

In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo
In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo

Today's featured event:

The first total solar eclipse to occur in the continental United States in nearly 40 years is happening today. A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes exactly between the Earth and the sun, causing the moon's shadow to glide across Earth.

From 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. today, Science Museum Oklahoma's Planetarium staff will be answering questions, helping guests in safely viewing the eclipse through telescopes and hosting special eclipse-theme shows in the Kirkpatrick Planetarium. Ten planetarium shows are planned during that time.

Activity tables facilitated by the museum's education team will be available outside from 11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m. The museum also will have a feed of the eclipse showing both the Oklahoma sky and NASA's live image on screens throughout the building.

The last total solar eclipse visible from the continental U.S. was on Feb. 26, 1979, according to the museum, and it was primarily visible from the Pacific Northwest. While not in the direct path of totality, Oklahoma City will experience approximately 85 percent obscuration of the sun at about 1:05 p.m. today.

Indoor eclipse activities are included with the museum's general admission. There is no charge for outdoor eclipse activities.

The museum's Science Shop is sold out of eclipse glasses. According to NASA, people can only look safely at the sun during the eclipse with special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or a handheld solar viewer. An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially-eclipsed sun is with a pinhole projector. With this method, sunlight streams through a small hole – such as a pencil hole in a piece of paper, or even the space between your fingers – onto a makeshift screen, such as a piece of paper or the ground. It’s important to only watch the screen, not the sun. Never look at the sun through the pinhole -- it is not safe.

Science Museum Oklahoma is located at 2020 Remington Place. For more information on its eclipse-related activities, go to www.sciencemuseumok.org/eclipse.

To read about what several Oklahoma State Parks have planned for eclipse viewing, click here.

To read about eclipse viewing opportunities at the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum's Survivor Tree, click here.

To read an update about the Myriad Botanical Gardens' Great American Eclipse event, click here.

To follow NASA's live coverage, click here.

For more Oklahoma events, go to newsok.com/events.

-BAM

Related Photos
In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo

In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo

<figure><img src="//cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r960-f90b9c8773e8189e801c9a4599438e15.jpg" alt="Photo - In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo " title="In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo "><figcaption>In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. AP photo </figcaption></figure>
Brandy McDonnell

Brandy McDonnell, also known by her initials BAM, writes stories and reviews on movies, music, the arts and other aspects of entertainment. She is NewsOK’s top blogger: Her 4-year-old entertainment news blog, BAM’s Blog, has notched more than 1... Read more ›

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