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Trout season now open at Dolese Youth Park Pond in Oklahoma City

Tobey Stroup fishes for trout at Dolese Park with his dog, Diesel, in Oklahoma City on Thursday's opening day of the rainbow trout season. [Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman]

Tobey Stroup fishes for trout at Dolese Park with his dog, Diesel, in Oklahoma City on Thursday's opening day of the rainbow trout season. [Photo By Steve Gooch, The Oklahoman]

Trout fishing is now underway at the Dolese Youth Park Pond, 5105 NW 50.

The season opened Thursday and runs through Feb. 28. About 5,300 rainbow trout will be stocked during the 13-week season.

The fish will average 3/4-pound in weight, and 90 percent of the fish will be 9 to 14 inches long, said Bob Martin, fisheries biologist for Oklahoma City.

The remaining 10 percent will be trophy fish, approaching 24 inches in length, Martin said.

Trout will be stocked about every two weeks: Dec. 13 and 28, Jan. 10 and 24, Feb. 7 and 21.

The best fishing is normally a couple of days after the fish are stocked as the hatchery-raised rainbows get acclimated to their new surroundings.

A free family trout fishing clinic will be held Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. at the Putnam City High School Gymnasium, 5300 NW 50 St.

Anglers can learn about the best bait and fishing lures to catch trout, angler ethics, knot tying, casting and other fishing skills.

To fish for trout at Dolese, anglers between the ages of 16 and 62 must have a state fishing license and a city fishing permit. City fishing permits cost $3.50 for a daily permit and $18.50 for an annual permit.

During trout season, only one rod and reel per angler is allowed. The daily catch limit is six trout per angler.

Fishing is allowed from the bank only at the Dolese Youth Park Pond. Each angler must keep trout on his or her own stringer with his or her name and state fishing license number attached.

Ed Godfrey

Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more... Read more ›

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